Wednesday, May 19, 2010

More May Color



I am continuing with the photo journey down my street.
The plant in the middle of this photo is an ornamental grass in bloom. Please notice the bumps on the top of the Saguaro. They are buds that will turn into creamy white blossoms. See the result on the last photo posted.


Forsythia in my planter.



A large cactus.





This is a Saguaro in blossom. The O'odham Indians knock the fruit off with long poles and make jam, jelly, candy and other goodies from it. To see how this fruit is harvested click on the link below.

http://www.saguaro-juniper.com/i_and_i/cacti/saguaros/saguaro_processing
/saguaro_harvest.html

17 comments:

Vagabonde said...

The creamy bud on that Saguaro cactus is lovely. I’d like to have a rock garden with these types of plants, but here in Georgia the soil is red orange for clay rather than sand, and it is very humid. I have a Christmas cactus but that is a different species I would guess.

20th Century Woman said...

Lovely pictures. I am so glad to be back on the net -- at home in Washington -- so I can read my favorite blogs once again.

la peregrina said...

Thank you for posting photos two days in a row. There can never be too many photos of cactus flowers for me. Love, love, love them.

Anil P said...

Such beautiful plants. I haven't seen any of these but still they seem wonderful.

Rinkly Rimes said...

You live in a beautiful area and your photographs do it justice.

loveable_homebody said...

I love cacti! I wonder what their fruit tastes like... Neat pictures!

Darlene said...

*Vagabonde - Yes, actually a Christmas Cactus is not a cactus at all.

*20th Century Woman - Welcome Back to your Washington home.

*la peregrina - You are so very welcome.

*Anil P - The Saguaro is native to the Sonoran Desert.

*Rinkly Rimes - I love the area and that's why I put up with the Republican politicians. ;-) But I know our political woes must bore you.

Grannymar said...

The cacti are fascinating. I was scrolling back to enjoy again the colour of the various plants,

Darlene said...

*Grannymar - I'm glad that you looked at the previous post to see all of the photos. For some reason, blog spot will not let me post very many at a time unless I make them small.

Joy Des Jardins said...

I just love your pictures Darlene because I don't get a chance to see these kinds of beautiful plants around here. They are so wonderful. ~Joy

Anonymous said...

I miss seeing the cacti and oleanders - the cacti from my home in NM, the oleanders from where I worked in Los Angeles. Thanks for the lovely photos.
Cop Car
P.S. Pink forsythia? Wow! (Or did my eyes cross?)

Darlene said...

*Cop Car - I have both pink and lavender forsythia in my planter. At least I think it's forsythia; my neighbor identified it for me. It was here when I moved in and I didn't know what it was so I am relying on her expertise. I hope I am identifying it correctly.

naomi dagen bloom said...

Darlene, Walking your street is sweet and so different from mine in the chilly Northwest. You offer us an important plus of blogging--seeing others' landscapes, thinking how the differences may affect how we look at the world.

Darlene said...

*naomi dagen bloom - Sometimes I do wonder if the climate affects the way we look at the world. When you think of the attitudes of different parts of the country I tend to wonder if our sunny south fries the brains of some people. ;-)

AMIT said...

Lovely pictures.I like it.

Adsense Alternative

popps said...

What does all this smell like?

Darlene said...

*AMIT - Thank you for your visit and your kind words. I do hope you'll stop by again.

* POPPS - So nice of you to stop by. I hope you will do so again.

As far as I know there is no scent. I'm not about to get my nose close enough to those spires to check it out. ;-)